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2001 – Leave aside the fact that Salmi filed the petition dressed in a green cape, white longjohns, green glitter boots with a five- centimetre heel and a toilet paper roll strapped to his head. Forget that Salmi argued his case before a B.C. Supreme Court justice dressed in a T-shirt painted with a Superman-styled S painted over his white longjohns. And try not to think about the fact that Sa Tan is the self-described anarchist’s legal name.

The Vancouver Sun
February 8, 2001
Page B1 
Rhinos vow to restore deMOCKracy: 
Brimming with satire at the expense of too-serious politicians, the Rhino party will save us from boredom
Daphne Bramham

The Rhino Resurrection is coming just in time to save us from being bored to death during this spring’s provincial election.

Yes, the Rhino Party is making a comeback. Naturally, there’s no real platform. Every candidate will make up his or her promises and break them if elected.

Self-appointed leader Brian (Godzilla) Salmi will be running in Vancouver-Mount Pleasant against incumbent New Democrat Jenny Kwan. He’s dumping his old promise that if elected, he will not serve. This time, if he’s elected, Salmi will serve. And that’s a promise.

Salmi also promises a “wrassling” match between the new premier and Alberta’s Ralph Klein. The winner gets the Rockies. Vancouver will be renamed Funcouver — the new capital of Lalaland. The suburbs will be moved to Victoria, where they belong, in exchange for the legislature, which Salmi would put atop GrouseMountain. The view’s better and you don’t have to go far to get there.

“It’s time to bring back the spirit of rhinocerosism,” says Salmi, skipping easily over that last word.

Rhinocerosism is simple to do, if not say. It’s about fun and creativity. It’s about staring banality in the face and laughing at it. It’s about pratfalls, bad puns and bad taste. And it’s about satirizing the folks who take the game of politics too seriously.

You might recall Salmi. He set up the Gnu Democratic Rhino Reform Party in 1993 after a split with the Quebec wing (limb?) of the party over whether it was politically correct to run stripper Blondie Butler against then-prime minister Kim Campbell and to run professional dominatrix Mistress Elle (for party whip, of course) in Delta.

For some bizarre reason, the rump of the Quebec Rhino Party said candidates either had to have a degree in political science or pass a political science quiz. This in a party set up by anarchists, dadaists, freaks and geeks to poke fun at the real guys? It was too much for Salmi, who joined the Rhinos because “it was funny and anarchic.”

Salmi founded the Gnu party and saddled it with the word Reform as a show of the Western alienation he was feeling. He promised to organize the party from Gnufoundland to the Gnukon under the slogan, “If you can’t bring yourself to vote for anyone, we’ll give you someone not to vote for.”

Salmi ended up running against Campbell because Blondie Butler couldn’t raise the $1,000 deposit required for the first time that year for all candidates. Salmi got some of his deposit money together by dressing up as Campbell with a pillow at his butt, standing on street corners and letting people kick him for a buck.

Before that campaign ended, Salmi was down at city hall urging everyone — especially “freaks and musicians” — to run for office in the municipal election because a change in the Municipal Elections Act eliminated the need for candidates to pay a deposit.

He ran again as an independent (although carrying a Gnu banner) in the 1997 federal election in Surrey under the name of Satan to poke fun at the folks in the Bible belt.

For this election, Salmi has recruited a whole new cast of characters. He says there are disaffected Greens, anarchists, some right-wingers and the aptly named Billy Hopeless — who is near- famous in the punk circuit as the lead singer of a Vancouver band called The Black Halos. Salmi says Hopeless is running from election, rather than for election because he and his band are on an around-the-world tour.

But as with most satire, there’s a serious side to all this fun.

“Never before in the history of deMOCKracy has there been a more urgent need for a Rhino resurrection,” Salmi writes in his call to arms (hooves?) on the Internet.

Leaving aside those shameless and shameful puns, Salmi makes the point that never before has voter turnout in Canada been so low. Describing himself alternately as a utopian idealist and a social libertarian, Salmi said in an interview that somebody needs to rekindle interest in the political process, particularly now, when voters seem to be so disenchanted with their choices.

Salmi also says somebody has to bring some creative energy back to Vancouver and create some fun, “despite the social puritans who seem to run this city.”

He points to the cancellation of the Molson Indy car race and the Symphony of Fire and calls it “the mainstream edge of what the underground has been dealing with for 10 years. So we want to send a message to the no-fun-niks that we’re taking the city back.”

So, the Rhinos — whose slogan is “It’s is far more fun to party than be a party” are bringing on the dancing girls. There will be strippers, burlesque dancers, comedians and The Carnival Band at the Rhino Resurrection. It’s happening on Valentine’s Day, starting at 8 p.m. at the Fabulous 50 Bourbon Street Pub in Gastown. Everybody with a strong liver and a sense of the absurd is invited.

The Vancouver Sun (editorial)
February 10, 2001
Page A22
Rhinos on their high horse

A rose by any other name smells as sweet. And a rhino running for office would, by any name, be as flaky. And that, perhaps, is a good thing.

Sun columnist Daphne Bramham reported Thursday that self- appointed leader Brian (Godzilla) Salmi was intending to dust off the moribund Rhino label and run candidates in the B.C. election this spring.

Friday’s e-mail brough an oppressive-sounding response from Charlie McKenzie, “Interim Chef” of the “Parti Rhinoceros- Rhinoceros Party.”

“There are no plans to revive the party at anytime in the future, nor has the party sanctioned any provincial off-shoots,” he says. “The name … is protected by copyright and history. Any attempts to use it without permission will result in legal action.”

Whew! Shades of the Alliance and the Tories. With this kind of in- fighting, so remisicent of the mainstream, these guys might yet become a credible party.

Vancouver Courier
March 1, 2001
Page 1
Bobus loses licence to perform
Sandra Thomas

Dressed in a big red hat, polka-dot coveralls and giant black shoes, Bobus the Clown pleaded with the parks board Monday night to let him continue selling balloons in StanleyPark.

He was backed by almost a dozen members of the Rhino Party in clown costumes, who chanted, “Leave the clown alone,” and presented chairwoman Laura McDiarmid with a Jello brain and a box of paper hearts—items they felt the board is lacking.

But the board was unmoved and voted to change Bobus’s performance licence to a busker’s licence, which means he can no longer sell balloons or amplify his voice and must change locations every hour.

Bobus’s 56-year-old creator Sterling Undem says the move means the death of the clown, who has entertained in the park for 14 years. “After a year on death row, Bobus will die April 1, and I’ll be holding a funeral in the park.”

Undem said he received notice two years ago that his performance licence was at risk, but under an unofficial grandfather clause, he was temporarily allowed to continue entertaining. Last March, he received a second letter warning his licence would change April 30.

Undem said the main point of contention is his sign offering balloon animals for $2 each. Under parks regulations, buskers and artists are not allowed to advertise or charge for services, with the exception of musicians selling original music. Undem said his sign saves confusion.

“Parents can look from a distance and see exactly what’s going on,” he said. “That way they have a choice of coming over, or heading in the other direction.”

Undem said he had no idea the Rhinos planned to create a spectacle on his behalf. “I received an e-mail from them telling me they were going to attend the meeting and that someone was going to strip naked,” Undem said from his Pitt Meadows home. “I told them I would be embarrassed by something like that and please don’t.”

Undem said he even picked up the silly string sprayed by one of the group members, who left the building when McDiarmid called a recess.

“I didn’t want it to get pushed into the carpet,” he said.

Parks media liaison Terry Clark, said Bobus is still welcome to entertain in the park and the licence restrictions are minor.

“If you only knew how many requests the board gets for people to sell or entertain in the park,” she said. “We have to be very careful or it could end up looking like Coney Island.”

Terry Walton, manager of recreation services for Stanley District, said Undem had the last remaining performance licence in the park.

As for Bobus, Undem has no plans for the future. Being Bobus was his only means of support, bringing in $200 on a good day.

“Out of Bobus a new character called Who Knows will rise, because who knows what will become of me after that.”

The Province
March 8, 2001
A5
Return of the Rhinos
Michael Smyth

Speaking of the Rhino Party, those political pranksters are back and running candidates in the election.

“Whoops of cacophonous laughter will boom from voting booths as fed-up citizens by the hundreds of thousands pump their fists in the air and yell, `Rhinos! Rhinos! Rhinos!”‘ pledges self-appointed Rhino leader Brian “Godzilla” Salmi. Check out their website at http://www.rhinoparty.ca

Vancouver Sun
March 12, 2001
Page B3
Endangered `fun’ the spark for giant street party: 
Young people running around with toilet-paper tubes on their heads is just one part of the protest over local councils’ anti-rave policies
Tom Barrett

Brian (Godzilla) Salmi has a vision. Salmi is the leader of the Rhino Party and in his vision he sees 10,000 young people running through the streets of downtown Vancouver with cardboard toilet- paper rolls stuck to their foreheads.

Then they hit each other with cream pies.

Salmi’s vision is scheduled to become reality on Saturday, in front of the VancouverArtGallery at 2 p.m.

And despite Vancouver’s recent reputation as the City That Fun Forgot, police don’t sound unduly alarmed at the prospect of thousands of teens running through the streets.

The event, known as Dayglow, is both a giant party and a protest against local councils’ anti-rave policies. It’s being organized by Bryan (silverfish) Bone, a Richmond art teacher.

Bone said he has received thousands of responses to the posters he’s been putting up around the Lower Mainland. Based on this, he expects 10,000 kids to turn up at the art gallery.

“The whole point of Dayglow is just for everybody finally to have a little bit of fun,” said Bone. “Vancouver needs some fun.”

Bone hopes to have six DJs, a live hip-hop group and maybe a punk band or two providing music for the event. Local youth organizations will have information tables set up around the edge of the crowd. There will be soap boxes from which people can give speeches between songs.

Participants are urged to bring toys, whistles, noise makers, squirt guns, spray string, posters, signs, candy, stuffed animals, bubbles, body paint, balloons, flags and snacks.

Bone is an earnest-sounding artist and activist who has been lobbying local councils to relax their restrictions on raves for young people. After coming up with the idea for Dayglow and printing thousands of posters, Bone approached Salmi, whom he describes as a “collaborator” on the project.

Salmi is a self-described troublemaker and prankster who is battling with the Rhino Party’s Quebec founders for the right to use the name. In 1993, Salmi ran a stripper named Blondie Butler against then-prime minister Kim Campbell and named a professional dominatrix, one Mistress Elle, as party whip.

Salmi hopes that after three hours of music, Dayglow participants will join something he calls the running of the rhinos, based on the running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain.

Rhino runners are asked to wear rhino horns on their foreheads; Salmi suggests taking the cardboard tube from a toilet-paper roll and fixing it to your head with an elastic band.

Rhino runners are asked to bring a cream pie to throw in somebody’s face at the end of the run.

Bone didn’t sound too sure about the rhino run.

“We need to talk about that,” he said. “There’s certain directions they [the Rhinos] want to take with this for their own self-promotion. And it’s not necessarily conducive to the over-all goal that we want to achieve.”

The goal, he said, is immediate change in the way councils are dealing with young people’s attempts to have fun — by blocking their efforts.

The event is billed as “FUNarchy in the Streets — A celebration to stop the repression of youth culture” and organizers are careful to warn away anyone who might want to spoil the fun.

“This is not a riot,” posters advise. “This is about putting some fun back into No Fun City. If you can’t have fun without being abusive, destructive or violent, stay home — we don’t want you there!”

Although Vancouver city police have been accused of trying to stamp out fun in the downtown core, Constable Anne Drennan isn’t asking people to stay away from Dayglow.

Although Bone and Salmi complained that police have not returned their phone calls, Drennan said someone from the force will be talking to them.

“Our concerns are safety issues,” she said. “We want to know whether or not traffic is likely to be impeded or if there’s any possibility of people overflowing onto streets that are likely to be closed.”

Drennan said police will have a series of crowd-control plans in place, depending on how many people show up.

And, she said, police won’t even be disturbed if Salmi and Bone don’t apply for a permit for the event.

Which they say they won’t.

“One of the major things that we’re protesting is the red tape garbage that’s being put in place to discourage any sort of youth activities,” said Bone. “So it didn’t make any sense to get permits.”

Globe and Mail
March 15, 2001
R2
Finally a party in No Fun City

Rave activists in Vancouver plan to put some fun back into No Fun City with a giant protest party Saturday afternoon in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Dayglow is being organized by Bryan Bone, a Richmond art teacher, and Brian Salmi, a self-described prankster, to protest perceived antirave policies in the region.

The event — which is being billed as “FUNarchy in the streets — A celebration to stop the repression of youth culture” — will feature cream pies, noise-makers, body painting, six DJs and a live hip-hop band. More than 10,000 young people from around the Lower Mainland are expected.

Vancouver Sun
March 31, 2001
B1
Petty rules, protesters robbing Vancouver’s spirit, meeting hears
Janet Steffenhagen

Vancouver needs to change its attitude, loosen up and start having fun, civic leaders said Friday.

At the inaugural meeting of a Vancouver Board of Trade campaign to revitalize the city’s spirits — in the dumps since the Symphony of Fire, the Molson Indy and the Grizzlies announced plans to leave town — some blamed B.C.’s sluggish economy, but there was widespread agreement that Vancouver is being choked by rules, regulations, whiners and special-interest groups with more power than their numbers warrant.

“This knee-jerk embracing of the voice of protest is not without its cost and in my view, that cost is too high,” said Michael Francis, chairman of B.C. Film and BC Ferries, adding that it shows an “immaturity” that has robbed Vancouver of opportunities and quality of life.

Harri Jansson, board of trade chairman, said the Indy was knocked for being too noisy, while the annual fireworks display was slagged because of its tobacco sponsors and because some spectators littered.

It’s an attitude problem that is ruining the city, said Jansson in an assessment that was echoed by Rick Antonson, president of Tourism Vancouver, and John Nightingale, director of the Vancouver Aquarium, at a breakfast meeting to kick off the Spirit of Vancouver campaign.

Nightingale, who has faced years of controversy over the aquarium’s display of live animals, said protests from small groups have made life difficult for many organizations and have overshadowed the majority. For example, there were loud complaints from a few people inconvenienced by the Symphony of Fire, “but do we accept that view and disenfranchise” the many thousands who enjoyed it, he asked.

To applause from the crowd of 500, he added: “We even had a debate about widening the (Stanley Park) causeway by 45 inches!” While dissent is a natural part of the process, Vancouver doesn’t seem to know when it’s time to move on, he added.

Blaine Culling, president of Granville Entertainment Group, said Vancouver is in a crisis.

“We are afraid to celebrate and have fun,” he said, adding that the city’s millennium celebrations were a joke after police told the public to stay out of the downtown. “They had more fun in Abbotsford.”

While the Indy, the Grizzlies and the Symphony of Fire have focused the debate, Culling and others noted they alone haven’t created the trials. Vancouver has also lost the PNE parade, the Sea Festival, the bathtub races and Triple A baseball.

He urged Vancouverites to take action and not to be lulled by the region’s natural beauty. “If we want to close a street to have a party, we will do it. We have a right to do it,” he said.

Nathan Lusignan, president of the Vancouver district student council and the only teenager to address the forum, said no one is more bored in the city than the youth.

“There’s nowhere to go and nothing to do,” he said, adding that if six young people gather in a park, they are soon told to move on; if they have a party, it is broken up and attendees told to go home.

Brian (Godzilla) Salmi, leader of the local branch of the Rhino Party, watched from the sidelines dressed in a green cape, white underwear and green mask with attached empty toilet roll as his rhino horn. During a question and answer period, he stepped to the microphone and offered to help create some fun, warning that Vancouver “is ready to blow.” He added that “the repression that goes on in this city … is going to kick off another riot.”

But Carole Taylor, head of the campaign, was optimistic about change. She believes the economic problems have bottomed out and now is the time to return to the “good old days” when Vancouver was vibrant and alive, around the time of Expo 86. Some suggested the bid for the 2010 Winter Olympics for Vancouver-Whistler might provide the spark.

Taylor proposed that the group meet once a month to encourage a broad public debate, and asked that comments and suggestions be e- mailed to spirit@boardoftrade.com.

Vancouver Sun 
May 11, 2001
Page A12 
He’s mad for social justice: 
Theatrics aside, Rhino party leader Brian Salmi has raised an important issue of electoral access
Daphne Bramham

Should poor people be denied the right to run for office? That’s the crux of the question raised in B.C. Supreme Court by Brian Godzilla Salmi, leader of the B.C. Rhino party, earlier this week. A decision is expected to be released this morning.

Leave aside the fact that Salmi filed the petition dressed in a green cape, white longjohns, green glitter boots with a five- centimetre heel and a toilet paper roll strapped to his head. Forget that Salmi argued his case before a B.C. Supreme Court justice dressed in a T-shirt painted with a Superman-styled S painted over his white longjohns. And try not to think about the fact that Sa Tan is the self-described anarchist’s legal name.

The questions Salmi has asked the court to decide are serious ones. Is the $100 deposit fee required under the B.C. Election Act a barrier to a citizen’s right to run for office? And, if it is a barrier, isn’t it an infringement of that person’s Constitutional rights?

Salmi argues that the deposit is unconstitutional because it runs contrary to Section 3 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms that says every citizen has the right to vote in an election and to be qualified to run for election. And it is worth pointing out that the rights set out in that section of the charter are deemed to be so important to Canadian democracy that this section is the only one that can not be overridden by the notwithstanding clause.

Salmi decided to launch the court challenge because his planned campaign against B.C. Liberal leader Gordon Campbell in Vancouver- Point Grey never got under way because he couldn’t afford the $100 deposit. Salmi argues that the deposit, which is forfeited if the candidate fails to get 15 per cent or more of the popular vote, is “a de facto economic means test that discriminates against the poor.”

What he wants the Supreme Court to do is to quash the section of the Election Act that requires the deposit as well as another section that requires a candidate to have an auditor before he or she can become a candidate. Salmi is also asking the court to hold the election in Vancouver-Point Grey in abeyance (which could deny Gordon Campbell a seat on election day), allow Salmi’s name on the ballot on May 16 and order the chief electoral officer to pay all the costs associated with the legal action.

Even though Salmi’s campaign against Campbell might have been intended as a stick-in-the-eye to the Liberal leader, that doesn’t mean that he or his court challenge should be lightly dismissed because the issues he is raising have already been seriously considered at least once by the courts.

Justice Anne Molloy of the Ontario Court of Justice looked at the constitutionality of deposits and refunds in her 1998 ruling on a case involving the Communist Party of Canada.

The Communist party was challenging sections of the Canada Elections Act that said a party must have 50 or more candidates to qualify for party status and without that status, a party can not issue tax receipts to donors.

The Communist party argued that one of the reasons this provision is so onerous results from the section requiring a $1,000 deposit. It didn’t challenge the constitutionality of having a deposit, but it did argue the unfairness of having $500 refunded only if candidates get 15 per cent of the vote or more.

Despite that, in her 70-page judgment Justice Molloy called the payment of a fee as a precondition for running is “a significant limitation” on the fundamental democratic rights described in Section 3 of the Charter.

“I consider any financial obstacle to the right to stand for election to be a significant limitation on the right. This is the case whether the fee is $5 or $500 or $5,000,” she wrote.

“Suppose, for example, that an admission fee of $1 was charged at polling booths as a condition of casting a vote. This would constitute an unacceptable limitation on the right to vote regardless of whether individual voters could afford to pay the $1. I see no reason for treating the right to stand for election any differently.”

As for Elections Canada’s suggestion that a fee was needed to discourage people who are not “serious,” it is “reminiscent of archaic requirements of candidacy such as land ownership which have long since been abandoned.”

She also said that argument is irrational because it assumes among other things that candidates who aren’t “serious” have caused problems in elections and that only serious candidates can afford to lose their deposit (“The ability or willingness to risk losing $500 is more a measure of affluence than seriousness.”)

Brian Godzilla Salmi’s campaign against Campbell would almost certainly have been frivolous and irritating to Big P political players. But what he wants the court to decide is whether he has a constitutional right to do it.

Perhaps more importantly, what he’s asking the court and the rest of us is whether we believe our democracy is strong enough to embrace all kinds of candidates and all kinds of campaigns.

In asking this, Salmi is dead serious. And in answering his questions, both we and the court should be as well.

Vancouver Sun
May 12, 2001
Court rejects Rhino plea to halt election: Insisting a $100 deposit discriminates against poor candidates, party leader says he will charge ahead with his Charter challenge
A12

A judge has refused a request by the leader of the B.C. Rhino party to delay the election in Vancouver-Point Grey until the courts can rule on his claim that a deposit for candidates discriminates against the poor.

However, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Frank Maczko acknowledged Friday that Brian (Godzilla) Salmi, who claims the $100 deposit violates the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, raised some fundamental democratic issues.

Maczko went so far as agreeing that the long-haired Salmi, who appeared in a green and black checkered cape, white underwear and a toilet tissue roll attached to his forehead, might just have an argument that is eventually capable of overturning the results in the riding, where Liberal leader Gordon Campbell is expected to be elected next week in a landslide that will propel him into the premier’s office.

Salmi argues the deposit is an infringement of his rights, and that of any other person who intends to run for office but lacks the funds, because it is a barrier to poor people who wish to exercise their purported democratic rights.

But the B.C. Supreme Court justice said he would not accede to Salmi’s serious request of putting the vote in that riding on hold.

“Based on the arguments that I have heard, I think the applicant has a very strong case, however, it’s by no means certain,” Maczko said, delivering an oral decision from the bench.

He noted the right to seek office is similar to the right to vote for candidates seeking office in the House of Commons or the provincial legislatures.

While Salmi clearly demonstrated there was a serious issue to be heard, he had not demonstrated that irreparable harm would be done if the issue was not decided Friday.

If an injunction delayed the vote in Vancouver-Point Grey it would result in constituents in that riding being denied a voice in the legislature until the issue was decided in a lengthy court battle, which Maczko indicated would be unacceptable.

However, if Salmi was to successfully appeal the decision after the election, it would be possible to deal with the situation retroactively, “by allowing the election to go ahead and then setting it aside if the applicant is successful in his Charter challenge,” Maczko said.

Speaking on the courthouse steps, Salmi made it clear that in his view, democracy was the big loser of the day, not the Rhino party.

“I would have to say that in light of this decision, the Supreme Court said that democracy does not exist in this country.”

Salmi said he hopes he has the opportunity to go head-to-head in a byelection with Campbell if his court challenge succeeds.

“I don’t want a bunch of fringe candidates. I don’t want a bunch of NDP or Unity fringe candidates,” he said.

National Post
May 15, 2002
A7
Caped crusader takes election law battle to Supreme Court: Rhinos can’t afford to run
Jonathon Gatehouse

Godzilla is angry. Brian “Godzilla” Salmi, the force behind the B.C. Rhino Party, has taken umbrage with the province’s election laws. And with no model of Tokyo in sight, he’s planning to take his wrath out on Gordon Campbell.

Mr. Salmi, a freelance journalist, wanted to run as a candidate in the riding of Vancouver-Point Grey, where Mr. Campbell, the leader of the Liberal Party and favourite to become Premier, is standing for re-election. But when a $100 candidate’s deposit scuttled the Rhino’s meager campaign before it started last month, he decided to take his revenge in court.

“I’m dirt poor, homeless and penniless. But I’m dead serious,” hesaid. “Why shouldn’t the poor have the right to run for office?”

Mr. Salmi, who argues that the deposit rule violates the section of the Charter of Rights that guarantees that every citizen can vote and be qualified to hold office, wants to have the results of this Wednesday’s vote declared null because his name isn’t on the ballot. And though he lost a bid last Friday to have the election halted while his argument is heard, a B.C. Supreme Court judge said his reasoning has at least a little bit of merit.

“Based on the arguments that I have heard, I think the applicant has a very strong case,” Justice Frank Maczko said in his ruling.

The judge ruled the residents of Point Grey should have representation while the matter is hashed out in court, but he noted that the results could be set aside if the charter challenge succeeds.

He has few illusions that he could beat Mr. Campbell — the Rhino leader garnered “more death threats than votes” in 1997 when he changed his name to Sa Tan and ran for federal office in the province’s Bible belt — Mr. Salmi is determined to cause a ruckus.

He hopes to stand before court dressed in long underwear and checkered cape, and argue his own case. “After all,” he said, “even poor anarchist scum like me are protected by the constitution.”

The Province (Vancouver)
June 4, 2001
Page A11
Rhino plans to sue Liberals

Gordon Campbell and the B.C. Liberals were accused yesterday of being “thugs” by the Rhino Party and an Internet radio station.

Rhino Leader Brian Salmi said he’ll take legal action today against the Liberals for roughing him up while ejecting him from their election-night victory party in downtown Vancouver.

“It’s interesting because they hadn’t been declared victors for more than an hour before they were already assaulting their political opponents,” said Salmi.

He said he was assaulted by three Liberal strongmen while being ushered out of the Liberal party at the Wall Centre Hotel on May 16.

A videotape taken for MyCityRadio.com shows Salmi and fellow Rhino candidate Liar Liar being ejected by three men.

Mike Morton, press secretary to Campbell, said he was unaware of the allegation.

“This is all news to me,” he said.

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